Strange Perceptions of SciFi

Talk about anything that comes to mind and doesn't fit in another forum.

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Postby KaraS on Sat Dec 02, 2006 7:10 pm

sleeper wrote:
MadaboutBen wrote:There was a Star Trek "geek" once who tried to argue with me that Star Trek had saved Babylon 5! :roll:
:D


Obviously the Star Trek fan knew nothing of B5.

There were 3 scifi shows that I watched when I was a kid, Space 1999, Project UFO, and Star Trek. Then came the Movies, 2001, Star Wars, Alien. I became obsessed with Dr. Who (Tom Bakers is still the best Dr. btw) when I found it late one night on the local pbs channel. It wasn't until all the stupid ST spin off shows had finally ended that I was finally able to turn my attention to Farscape (I never had the scifi channel :( )
I watched the PK wars first and I was hooked....took me about 2 months to absorb all the shows and I enjoyed it all. CB is HOT!

Anyway to get back to the theme of this thread which is about "Beam me up Scotty" It's just a catch phase that some comedian started as a joke and unforturnatly it has stuck with the uneducated scifi person as an attempt to be funny when they don't want to be embarressed in how little they know about scifi. :wink:


Beam Me Up Scotty is a real line from the show. Kirk said it, or a variation on it, in several episodes. Bumper stickers, tee shirts and other merchendise were made with variations on this phrase so it became a part of popular culture. I have seen Beam Me Up Scotty, There's No Intelligent Life Here and also Beam Me Up Scotty, It Ate My Phaser. Doubtless there are other variations around as well.

I must contest your classification of the various ST spin off shows as stupid. They started to go downhill with Voyager and Enterprise, but even those series had some good episodes among the clunkers.

And both TNG and DS9 were wonderful. While TNG may look a little dated today, I remeber watching the eps for the first time and they were magical! After waiting for 20 years, finally new episodes of Star Trek were on the air. We used to have Star Trek parties in my college dorm to watch them together. These were real scientific concepts presented in a mature manner. What other scifi series would attempt an episode about a dyson sphere?

And DS9, centering less on plot and gee wiz technology, and more on character was even better! The cast of reocurring characters grew over the seasons and the range of plots was enormous. One week we had an episode about the war with the Dominion, the next week we explored Klingon customs with Worf, the week after that followed Dr Bashir and his holodeck spy adventures, the week after that centered on the love life of Leetah the Dabbo Girl etc... This was probably the very best and most diverse ensemble show of any genre ever shown on TV! And the plots about war, terrorism, treatment of prisoners of war, religious fanaticism and espionage are as topical today as they were when they were made. Aside from the fx, this show hasn't aged at all. Check it out on Spike TV if you don't believe me.

Now, DS9 and B5 premiered in the same season, only a few days apart (if I remember correctly) and at the time much was made out of the fact that there were 2 shows about space stations and how one must be ripping off the other. Of course, two hospital shows set in Chicago or two cop dramas set in New York City could premier together and nobody would think it strange so merely having similar settings doesn't mean one was copying the other.

I can see how someone could make a case that the existence of the extremely popular Star Trek shows (both TNG and DS9 were on the air in syndication and getting good ratings when B5 was starting) would bring media exposure to other scifi projects and that B5 would benefit from this. Scifi was IN. And since both DS9 and B5 were high quality projects and had similar settings, each benefitted from any press that the other got.

Of course this didn't help Space Rangers which premiered at the same time as B5 and DS9 because it was BAD! It lasted 5 or 6 episodes, and considering how bad the series was, that was generous IMHO.
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Postby pushka on Sun Dec 03, 2006 1:51 pm

I was brought up on sci-fi! You hardly see it on 5-channel terrestrial TV anymore since Sky bought the rights to everything, but they still show Star Trek and TNG on BBC2 from time to time.

I remember when I was younger when there were many sci-fi shows and I'd be stuck in front of the TV all day! Star Trek, TNG, Babylon 5, Buck Rogers, Space 1999, UFO, Battlestar Galactica! Yep, I watched every single one of those!

Then DS9 came along and I loved that! Voyager is my real favourite though. Then of course Farscape; the trailer for it nearly made me crazy until it came out! I never got into SG1, mainly because I loved the film so much and didn't think much of the spinoffs. Enterprise started off poorly and I never got into it, but hey, I might try it again. Futurama I'm hooked on, brilliant show! The new Battlestar, no, not for me. I liked the old one too much, especially the old theme music! And the new Doctor Who is great, but I'm not really into Torchwood.

I'm not troubled about admitting that I wait eagerly for the arrival of any new decent looking sci-fi series/film. I've been hooked on sci-fi since I was born pretty much, all those 19 years ago! So, I've been badgered about being a sci-fi geek all my life, but I don't care, at least I have an imagination! What got me was a load of my friends who were so anti-sci-fi they'd never go anywhere near Star Trek, Farscape or anything but yet they loved Futurama! But they still swear they hated sci-fi. I've been called anything from a geek, a nutter, a psycho, a Trekky, you name it! But sci-fi is in my blood and I'm proud to be a sci-fi nut!

So all those sci-fi haters out there who've never even given it a try can kiss my shiny metal ass! (I mean arse, I'm British!)
Pushka the Cannon - Cannonade strikes again!
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Postby AERYNSUN on Sun Dec 03, 2006 2:13 pm

I remember Space 1999. It was my first favourite sci fi show, I was a kid, when it was aired. Now Many years after, a friend of mine, knowing I am a devoted sci fi fan gave me the Space 1999 show on DVD. It0s strange watching sci fi shows from the seventies after watching Farscape, and Stargate and so,.. The techonology they use and the way they are filmed, the furniture they used... it's so different!!

I loved the character of Maya, for her ability to transfor in other things, birds, trees..... or even in other alien..

I loved THG, too. Now they are airing Star Trek voyager in a tv channel and in another one they are airing the original Star Trek series, at the same time.

Bur in my opinion, There's no better show like FARSCAPE.
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Postby Mad on Sun Dec 03, 2006 8:27 pm

I have grown with space 1999, the series that it has made me to get passionate for science fiction....

This coproduction UK ,Italy ,Usa years 70 with the big Martin landau was wonderful,above all the season 1,decidedly strange and disturbing..
Sin is duration two season...








MAD of love.......farscape
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Postby ShalakoTato on Sat Dec 30, 2006 2:17 pm

I'm older than dirt, and I've been a SciFi fan since childhood; first with books, and then with TV and movies. Most of my friends are surprised and amused that I'm a SciFi fan, but I do have 2 or 3 that are equally addicted. Many of the former consider it childish, but I agree with SunKrux that people who cannot enjoy SciFi have stunted imaginations and as Blackadder says: "missing the boat on some really good entertainment." Their loss.

One of my friends has a PhD in Physics, and was practically foaming at the mouth when he said that he never watches SciFi because it's not realistic or factual. Duh! It's Science Fiction, not Science Fact. :roll: Furthermore, many of the things that were imagined in Science Fiction have actually, through the years, become facts of everyday life.

Nevertheless, there seem to be more of us these days. i.e. Science Fiction fans. Hopefully that's a trend that will continue. If not, too bad for those who mock Science Fiction. They don't know what they're missing. :)
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Postby AERYNSUN on Sat Dec 30, 2006 3:56 pm

I completely agree with you. You say you have sone friends who like it, in my case I'm on my owjn, I'm the only one who likes sci fi. Fortunatelly there are places like this forum where we can talk about it freely, woth no restrictions, and that's good.
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Sci-Fi

Postby Easterner9504 on Sat Dec 30, 2006 7:17 pm

The bumper sticker:

"There's no intelligent life here....Beam me up Scotty"

Kirk never said those exact 4 words, the closest came in THE DOOMSDAY MACHINE.

The Physicist I can understand, when your an expert at something Hollywood's usual crap is a turn off. Examples:
John Wayne's THE COMANCHEROS is set in late 1830's, yet everyone is armed with guns of 1870's-1890's. Meaningless to the masses, I can't watch it as a historian or weapons expert. THE MUMMY a fun movie yet the openning move of Legionaires in Egypt is nonsense, no one walks 1000 miles across the desert, they'd hire a ship. The battle was nonsense, cavalry has been helpless agaist infantry since the 1860's! They would have opened fire at 1200 yds and the Arabs would have been wiped out by the time any got within 100 yards. 99% of movie viewers don't know this so it's just Hollywood "fun."

Pigeonholes

That's where Sci-Fi fans are. Society and Hollywood love Pigeonholing.
Example: Movies SHENANDOAH and THE RAID are listed as westerns. Both are Civil War stories yet horses and pistols mean WESTERN; the former was in Virginia the latter in Vermont, NY and Ontario, Canada. APOLLO 13 is classed as Sci-Fi yet is actually historical, but spaceships = Sci-Fi as it did in SPACE COWBOYS!

Sci-Fi slowly developed in the 19th C. from FRANKENSTEIN to Verne to HG Wells. It took off under John Campbell in 30's with ASTOUNDING and other pulp magazines (remember DS9 episode on this and Kira and Cisco were not welcome in photos: no Blacks, no girls), he developed folks like Asimov, Bradbury, Heinlein and Clarke. The appeal was primarily teen-age boys. filmed Sci-Fi ('50's) appealed to same crowd, this pigeonholed the genre as juvenile (like comics) a perception that has not changed to this day. Note even adult sci-fi of period DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL and FORBIDDEN PLANET had the kid and the cutesy robot/cook combo respectively. OUTER LIMITS, THE INVADERS and STAR TREK TOS combined with 2001 began to bring some respectibility. Those teens of 30-40's were often engineers (eng. tend to love Sci-Fi) by then. Note the biggest movie stars have no Sci-Fi on their resumes only Charlton Heston and later Kirk Douglas ever did major films. Most films remained B (or C or Z) cheapos, some good, most bad. The bad acting was because the performers neither cared nor loved their product.

Note Sci-Fi is overwhelmingly about military as protaginist (ST, B:5. BSG) or antagonist (SW, FIREFLY, FARSCAPE) that is the old boy appeal. Guys like cool guns and gadgets. However the Feminist movement opened society's opportunities for women and at some point S-F writers caught on and more relationship based stories appeared. It is my unscientific observation that FS's fanbase is heavily female dominated, but then it took me 3 seasons to find ouy what a "shipper" was. :D

Conclusion (about time!)

Those non-Sci-Fi persons are mostly stuck on the juvenile early roots of sci-fi, just like in the comic book analogy someone gave. These folks are not necessarily without imagination, merely ignorant that times have changed and visual Sci-Fi has caught up to book standards (which they are also ignorant) of depth along with pigeonholing. Some mainstream films are Sci-fi the viewers just don't know it. (CHARLY, THE TERMINAL MAN, LOST)
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Postby KaraS on Sat Dec 30, 2006 8:49 pm

ShalakoTato wrote:I'm older than dirt, and I've been a SciFi fan since childhood; first with books, and then with TV and movies. Most of my friends are surprised and amused that I'm a SciFi fan, but I do have 2 or 3 that are equally addicted. Many of the former consider it childish, but I agree with SunKrux that people who cannot enjoy SciFi have stunted imaginations and as Blackadder says: "missing the boat on some really good entertainment." Their loss.

One of my friends has a PhD in Physics, and was practically foaming at the mouth when he said that he never watches SciFi because it's not realistic or factual. Duh! It's Science Fiction, not Science Fact. :roll: Furthermore, many of the things that were imagined in Science Fiction have actually, through the years, become facts of everyday life.

Nevertheless, there seem to be more of us these days. i.e. Science Fiction fans. Hopefully that's a trend that will continue. If not, too bad for those who mock Science Fiction. They don't know what they're missing. :)


I worked for awhile as a naturalist and you'd be amazed by some of the things people think about native wildlife. Some people are just ignorant about it, they don't know things the rest of us would think of as obvious. (For instance, I met a woman who thought owls were vegitarian!)

I've seen portrayals of the behaviour of wild animals on TV that made me cackle with laughter, like a MacGuyver episode where Mac picked up a "wild" rat and tied a string around it's middle and sent it scurrying through a pipe to get a rope threaded through the pipe. A real wild rat wouldn't put up with being picked up and having string tied around his middle. Mac would have needed shots and stitches if he'd tried it!

And I love how shots of a rat in the room show a male rat, then they switch to showing another shot, then they switch back to the "same" rat and it's a female.

So we all have our areas of expertise, wether it's knowledge of the behaviour of wild rats or antique pistols or nuclear physics or medecine (real doctors and nurses think shows like ER are hysterical in their inacuracies). And all TV shows and movies sacrifice reality in favor of what would help advance character or plot.

As for fellow scifi fans, I've never had any lack of them around me. My mother inducted me into the cult of Trek when I was a toddler and as I grew I found many other fans to converse with. As many female as male, so I never really understood how Scifi is considered a guy thing.
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